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HVAC Forest Glen Chicago | Expert Energy Efficient System Designs

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Don’t be confused by the name NY Engineers is your best option if you are searching for Full Service Heating Cooling Air Conditioning Furnace (HVAC) Engineering Firm in Chicago Illinois. We’re not only an HVAC Contractor near Chicago but also a leading provider of Sprinkler Design Engineering services near Forest Glen Chicago. Contact us at (+1) (312) 767-6877

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In recent times Hundreds of individuals have been taking a look at our website in search of Value Engineering in or near Chicago. This is due primarily due to the reputation we have develop in this types of projects. However, a lot of building owners from Berkeley to Park Ridge, IL, are not aware that NY Engineers is also a top choice for anyone searching for HVAC Chicago, Illinois

The quest for power efficient buildings involves energy efficient HVAC system design. This can include systems for domestic water heating, architectural enclosure, HVAC, lighting, and vertical transportation. The loads for that HVAC systems will come primarily from five different sources including lighting (cooling), the building envelope (cooling and heating), ventilation (cooling and heating), equipment for program use (cooling) and occupancy (cooling).
The ventilation load is a purpose of either the mechanisms needed in order to introduce it in a space and control contaminant concentration or the amount of folks which will occupy the area. In virtually all climates in the eastern and southwestern regions of the US, to reduce outside air flow helps save energy whenever the

outside air is either humid and warm or very cold.
Managing the ventilation rate will probably be determined by occupancy which is called a kind of demand control ventilation. This is a everyday sort of energy conservation tatic which is used for rooms with irregular or heavy occupancy. Having cooling and heating loads dropped to a minimum can be carried out by using a very high performance building envelope, occupancy sensors, and high performance lighting that utilize daylight response of lighting controls.

Chicago HVAC Engineers versus HVAC Technicians

When you’ve ever discussed the distinction between a HVAC Engineers versus HVAC Technicians, then read on:

HVAC engineers are the folks that supervise the installation of air conditioner systems for both residential and commercial buildings. They spend a great deal of their day in offices doing higher level management and planning of installations nevertheless they do also go to job sites every so often.

On the other hand, HVAC technicians usually do a lot of the hands-on work with maintenance and repair. A HVAC tech may work with or for an engineer to perform several of the installation work, specifically on smaller jobs. In general HVAC technicians do far more travel and may spend time and effort changing filters, identifying leaks, doing recharges or getting rid of old and outdated systems that utilize old refrigerants.

HVAC engineers may have the ability to make more decisions about systems that are being used, and they will be the people who would offer assistance with probably the most sensible refrigerants and which systems would be perfect for a larger building. In the industry, there is certainly some challenge between ‘the suits’ and ‘the ones that will get their hands dirty’, but the two jobs require an effective familiarity with how air cooling works. Lately huge crowds have been crawling the NY-Engineers.Com website searching for things like HVAC Chicago Bar. However, the goal of our firm is to be the number one choice for anyone looking for a HVAC Contractor near Chicago and or any of our other services including Construction Engineering Engineering services. Furthermore everyone looking for additional info about our Heating & Air Conditioning (HVAC) Engineering Firm in Chicago Illinois stops by at our Electrical Engineers blog

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HVAC Engineering: Understanding Air Balancing in Ventilation Systems

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Air balancing is a fundamental design skill in HVAC engineering. Depending on the intended purpose of each building area, it may require negative, positive or neutral pressurization. This is accomplished by adjusting supply and exhaust airflows: a higher air supply causes positive pressure, while a higher air exhaust causes negative pressure.

Although the ideal scenario would be to ventilate all building areas naturally, this is not possible in practice. For example, there is no way to use natural ventilation in areas that are completely surrounded by other rooms, as well as in underground levels. The purpose of ventilation can range from human comfort to facility safety: ventilation in residential and commercial settings is focused on delivering air of breathable quality, while industrial ventilation is often deployed to keep dangerous gases away from certain areas or below a certain concentration.

Indoor spaces are subject to many airflows, and they are normally measured in cubic feet per minute (CFM). We tend to think only about the outdoor air supply and the exhaust air, but consider there is also unwanted air escape (exfiltration) and air gain (infiltration). Unwanted air flows typically occur around the edges of windows or doors.

Poorly balanced ventilation systems often lead to air quality issues, according to HVAC engineering professionals. For example, negative pressurization may draw in pollutants from above the ceiling or from outdoors, and air may rush in suddenly when a window or door is opened. 

Intake and Exhaust Air Calculation

Before air balancing calculations, it is important to know the required air supply and air exhaust. There are many valid procedures, as indicated by the following codes:

  • ASHRAE 62.1 – Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality
  • In the case of hospitals, ASHRAE 170 – Ventilation of Health Care Facilities

The total air supply is 60 cfm, while air exhaust is 150 cfm. Since exhaust is higher by 90 cfm, the result is negative pressurization. Increasing supply to balance airflow is acceptable, since the values provided in the code are only minimum values.

Assume all intake airflows are increased to the following values, in order to prevent negative pressurization:

  • Electrical room: 25 cfm
  • Corridor: 125 cfm
  • Storage: 25 cfm

This results in a total air intake of 175 cfm, which is higher than the 150 cfm of exhaust air. This causes cellar areas to be pressurized with respect to the trash room, preventing the spread of unpleasant odours. Since the airflow must be balanced at the end, the extra 25 cfm are released by exfiltration, but trash odour is confined to its intended location.

Troubleshooting Air Balancing Issues in HVAC Engineering

If a ventilation system suffers from air balance issues, do not immediately assume the cause lies in the fans themselves. Consider that system components such as dampers can be damaged, and also that air ducts can get disconnected. When in doubt, the best recommendation is getting a professional opinion from an HVAC design engineer.

When ventilation systems are equipped with variable frequency drives for fan speed control, air balancing is simplified. VFDs can adjust the rpm of both supply and exhaust fans, to match the ventilation load while keeping airflows balanced.

HVAC engineering is a complicated matter that is best approached by engineers that have specialized in this area of expertise. 

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